Thursday, December 13, 2018

The Winter Issue Is Out


In this issue of Today’s Transitions, we’re helping you make some major life decisions but in a mindful way. Read our Win in the Game of Later Life feature to find out how to make decisions that will have a positive impact on you and your loved ones. Plus, learn about some simple strategies for staying safe at home or on the street.

Thursday, November 22, 2018

“Learning to stretch and move to the edges of our body is a way of showing the body that we love it, care for it, and respect it...”


By Rachel Reynolds
Photo by Melissa Donald 


When it’s hard to reach that top shelf in a kitchen cabinet or bend over and tie a shoe, it’s often because our muscles are tight and lack flexibility. Stretching and flexing the body regularly can relieve tightness and increase pleasure in one’s daily routine.

Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Give Your Loved One Some Space (and that includes the holidays)


By Rachel Reynolds


Holiday meals can be both wonderful and hectic. Honoring a loved one’s need for quiet as well as connection is key for success. “Sometimes the chaos of the day is too much for someone with physical or cognitive issues,” says Becky Beanblossom, president of Home Instead Senior Care. Often saying hello to everyone and eating amounts to a full day for a loved one, and it’s best to let them retreat or go home early if they need to, she says. Encouraging them to help plan the menu is also a way to ensure that there will be food available that they can digest. “Just remember, forcing someone to stay when they feel uncomfortable or anxious is just asking for hurt feelings or conflict,” Becky says.

Thursday, November 15, 2018

4 Tips for Making Your Parents’ Big Move Seamless


By Marie Bradby


While taking care of your parents might span years, there are people available to do the hard work of getting them moved out of their homes and into senior care. Barbara Morris, 70, is founder of Smooth Transitions, a senior move management company that helps prepare, sort, pack, and move your loved one’s belongings. Active adults also use her company to help them downsize and move. Barbara no longer does the hands-on work; she trains new licensees for her 24-year-old company, which now has licensees in 26 states. She’s a founding member of the National Association of Senior Move Managers. Barbara offers these tips on how clients can make moving into a new place easier on themselves and their families.

Thursday, October 25, 2018

Is Your Loved One’s Care Headed in the Right Direction? Part 4

By Carrie Vittitoe
Illustration by Brittany Granville

The terminology surrounding senior care can be confusing. What’s the difference between assisted living and skilled nursing? What exactly is independent living? The industry happens to be in the midst of rebranding continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) as life plan communities, which may further contribute to the general public’s confusion.

Is Your Loved One’s Care Headed in the Right Direction? Part 3

By Carrie Vittitoe
Illustration by Brittany Granville

The terminology surrounding senior care can be confusing. What’s the difference between assisted living and skilled nursing? What exactly is independent living? The industry happens to be in the midst of rebranding continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) as life plan communities, which may further contribute to the general public’s confusion.

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Taking the Edge Off of Paranoia

By Brittani Dick


Like any mental condition, paranoia is debilitating to both the person diagnosed, as well as their caregiver(s). If you suspect your loved one may be suffering from paranoia, there are several signs to look for, according to Dr. Laura Morton, director of the Division of Geriatric Medicine at UofL. “In a geriatric patient, the symptoms will be sudden and new,” she states. The patient may suddenly become suspicious of others. They might believe someone is stealing their money, hiding things from them, trying to hurt them, or trying to take advantage of them.

If your loved one is suffering from paranoia you might be wondering what caused this condition in the first place. Is this a condition that could have been avoided with a lifestyle change? Do genetics play a role?

According to Dr. Morton, mood disorders, cognitive impairment, and medication changes are a few potential causes of paranoia. She also mentions the importance of consulting the primary care physician (PCP) first to rule out any medical conditions, such as an infection, that could be contributing to paranoia. Major life stressors and changes can also cause a person to suffer from paranoia.

To get a patient’s paranoia under control, Dr. Morton stresses the importance of finding the cause and treating it first. Non-medicinal means of treatment are preferred, but pharmaceutical medications can be beneficial if the first route is not successful. If the patient is diagnosed with a mood disorder, such as depression, that is contributing to his/her paranoia, anti-depression medications can be prescribed. If the patient is diagnosed with schizophrenia, for example, antipsychotic medications can be prescribed.

 Dr. Morton offers a host of ideas outside of medication that may help the patient cope with paranoia. “Some patients enjoy stuffed animals and baby dolls,” she says. “Pictures of family members, schedules, and routines may also help.” Other ideas include: music, robotic pets, and limiting loud noises.
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